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The Evolution of North Korean Human Rights Discourse and Activism: Domestic and Transnational Dimensions

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The Evolution of North Korea
9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m
October 27, 2016
Pryzbyla Center, Great Room A
The Catholic University of America,
620 Michigan Ave. NE, Washington DC

The Evolution of North Korean Human Rights Discourse and Activism: Domestic and Transnational Dimensions

NKHR Conf Photo
(Photo Credit: Danielle Chubb)

9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m
October 27, 2016
Pryzbyla Center, Great Room A
The Catholic University of America

Conference Registration

The 2014 United Nations Commission of Inquiry Report into North Korean Human Rights brought about a renewed focus on North Korean human rights. Behind the scenes, a growing network of transnational activists has been responsible for raising the profile of the North Korean human rights issue over a period of two decades. This conference turns the spotlight on these activists in an effort to understand the evolution of North Korean human rights discourse: the contentions, the hurdles and the assumptions underpinning it.

 

Conference Program

 

8:30-9:00           Registration                     

9:00-9:15            Welcome and Opening Remarks

9:15-10:30           SESSION I: States, Institutions, and the Making of North Korean Human Rights Discourse and Advocacy: the United States, European Union, and the United Nations

Chair:

Victor Cha, D.S. Song-Korea Foundation Chair in Government and International Affairs/Senior Adviser, (Georgetown University/Center for Strategic and International Studies)

Panelists:

  • Andrew Yeo (The Catholic University of America), “Bringing the State Back In: North Korean Human Rights Discourse in the United States”
  • Rajiv Narayan (Rafto Foundation for Human Rights), “North Korean Human Rights Discourse and Advocacy: The European Dimension”
  • Patricia Goedde (Sungkyunkwan University), “Human Rights Diffusion in North Korea: The Impact of Transnational Legal Mobilization”

Discussant:

  • Tsveta Petrova, Associate Research Fellow (Columbia University)

10:30-10:45          Coffee Break

10:45-12:00          SESSION II: North Korean Defectors, Activists, and the (Contentious) Rise of Transnational Networks

Chair:

Roberta Cohen, Co-Chair Emeritus (Committee on North Korean Human Rights)

Panelists:

  • Jiyoung Song (Lowy Institute for International Policy), “Discourses and Networks of North Korean Defector-Activists: A Complex Discourse Analysis”
  • Joanna Hosaniak (Citizens’ Alliance for North Korean Human Rights), “Activists’ Perspectives on North Korean Human Rights Discourse”
  • Danielle Chubb (Deakin University), “Understanding North Korean Human Rights Advocacy: Network Discourses and Dynamics”

Discussant:

Jennifer Hadden, Assistant Professor (University of Maryland, College Park)

12:00-1:15           Lunch and Keynote Address

Stephan Haggard, Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor of Korea-Pacific Studies (University of California, San Diego)

1:30-2:45             SESSION III:  NKHR Discourse on the Korean Peninsula and Asia: South Korea, North Korea, and Japan

Chair:

Katharine Moon, Professor of Political Science and Wasserman Chair of Asian Studies/Non-resident Senior Fellow (Wellesley College/Brookings Institution)

Panelists:

  • Sandra Fahy (Sophia University), “North Korea with and Against the World: Analysis of DPRK Media Rhetoric after the Commission of Inquiry Report”
  • Jacob Reidhead (Stanford University), “North Korean Human Rights Discourse in South Korea”
  • Mikyoung Kim (Hiroshima Peace Institute), “North Korean Human Rights Discourse in Japan: Betwixt the Subtle and the Obvious”

Discussant:

Celeste Arrington, Korea Foundation Assistant Professor (George Washington University)

3:00-3:15              Coffee Break

3:15-4:30              SESSION IV: The Evolution of NKHR Discourse and Advocacy and What it Means for Policy

  • Greg Scarlatoiu, Executive Director (Committee for Human Rights in North Korea)
  • Katharine Moon, Professor of Political Science and Wasserman Chair of Asian Studies/Non-resident Senior Fellow (Wellesley College/Brookings Institution)
  • Marcus Noland, Executive Vice President and Director of Studies (Peterson Institute for International Economics)
  • Frank Jannuzi, President and CEO (The Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation)
Moderator:  
Danielle Chubb (Deakin University)
 
This conference was made possible with generous support from the Korea Foundation and in collaboration with the Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies, Department of Politics, and the Asia Studies Program at The Catholic University of America.
 
Getting to The Catholic University of America
 
The Catholic University of America is located on the WMATA Metro System’s Red Line at the Brookland-CUA Metro station.  ***Please note that due to WMATA Safe-Track efforts, there may be delays on the Red-Line.  Please check Metro Safetrack for more information.
 
Parking is available at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception parking lot on the corner of Harewood Rd. NE and Michigan Ave NE.
 
Click Here for a map of the CUA Campus
 
Media Information
All media planning to attend and cover the conference must notify the Office of Public Affairs’ Media Relations Department at The Catholic University of America.